road trips

The Church of Hoctun in June

Hoctun (Mayan hoc - ti rip up and tun, stone) is a town best known for its colorful cemetery (considered one of the prettiest cemeteries in the country) that has appeared in this blog at some point, but it also has a photogenic church located in the main square, worth a stop on the way to or from the cemetery, as you continue your trip either to Izamal or on to Valladolid and/or Cancun.

For photographers, visit early, to get the best light in the cemetery and also at the church. These photos were taken in June, when the flamboyan or Royal Ponciana trees are in full bloom and contrast spectacularly with the stone church, the yellow walls and the deep blue Yucatan sky.

Here are some photos (click to enlarge) to whet your appetite.

Las Coloradas, Salt Production Center of the Yucatan - Day 1

On a good road trip, the journey there should be as much fun as the actual destination. In this post are some of the highlights for a trip to Las Coloradas, the salt flats that are near Rio Lagartos and lately famous for their “pink lagoons” which are man made evaporation ponds vital to the production of salt. The area was used by the Mayans back in the day, and in the 1930’s a businessman from Merida bought the land and began what is now one of the country’s major salt producers, with 80% of the salt produced going to the national market. The commercial brand of the salt produced here is Sal Sol and you can find it in any local supermarket.

Starting in Merida, you can take one of two routes: the toll or free highway to Valladolid and then up through Tizimin and on to the coast; or, the back road which start by heading towards Motul, home of the famous huevos motuleños, served up by doña Evelia in the municipal market. This should be your route and Motul your first stop, for breakfast of one, two or three (or more!) eggs.

With your breakfast completed and sustenance assured for the trip, have a look at the cenote and church before leaving Motul. Definitely worth a look!

The destination on this trip, for Day 1, was Tizimin, where an airbnb rental was waiting for us. Along the way there are plenty of stops to be made here and there and your trip can take anywhere between 2 and 4 hours, depending on how much fun you are having or how many photos you feel inspired to take. In our case, it took most of the day. Notice at kilometer 61, you will feel the need, the urge, to stop and photograph this pink gem. Temax is a good photo stop as well, and Chenché de las Torres is truly out of this world, if you can get in.

Finally, we arrived at Tizimin and after some navigational challenges with Google Maps and the recently changed one-way street system, we arrived around 4 PM at our airbnb.

In the evening a little dinner, walking and exploring downtown Tizimin on foot and by car - it reminded me of Merida 30 years ago - and then back to rest up for the following day, which was to be all about the salt, the beach and a most amazing Tikin Xic lunch!

Calakmul, Campeche

One of the greatest Mayan ruins sites on the peninsula, Calakmul is also a jungle paradise where you can see many local animals; including - if you are very lucky - the elusive jaguar. If you are looking for a "lost city in the jungle" this is definitely it.

The trip I recently did was Merida - Campeche - Champoton (lunch by the sea) - Escarcega - Xpujil where we overnighted in a small but decent enough hotel. The next day was spent at Calakmul and we returned to Xpujil for the evening. On the third day, onwards to Chetumal where I left my guests to take their flight back to San Miguel de Allende via Mexico City. The drive back from Chetumal to Merida takes about 5 hours if not making any stops. 

For a future trip I would spend more time in the area, as there are many other ruins sites to visit. Perhaps 5 days total leaving from and returning to Merida, making stops here and there during the driving portions of the trip.